growing guide

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  1. Winter WoodBlocX getting you ready for spring

    Winter WoodBlocX getting you ready for spring
    In the south, there have been very few really hard frosts, so even some tender bedding plants like geraniums have survived and it means that many of the bugs and other nasties are also thriving! So now is the time to go slug and snail hunting and dispose of them! Really we do need a good old cold snap to...
  2. Planting Late Summer Seeds… Choi Sum

    Planting Late Summer Seeds… Choi Sum
    There are a whole range of remarkably cold hardy oriental greens. They are ideal to keep your plot going through the depths of winter, particularly if you don't have the space or time for traditional winter veg like brussels. Many are good both in salads and cooked - try Pak Choi, Mizuna, Chinese Cabbage, Mibuna, Tatsoi and Mispoona, all...
  3. Successional Sowing: How to Get The Most From Your Raised Beds

    Successional Sowing: How to Get The Most From Your Raised Beds
    Sometimes less is more, so whether you have an allotment, a large kitchen garden or just a single raised bed, you should use successional sowing to ensure a steady, regular and appropriate supply of vegetables throughout the growing season, rather than experiencing a glut all at once. Basically, using the principle of little and often, it involves extending your harvest...
  4. How to deal with Creeping Buttercup

    How to deal with Creeping Buttercup
    The Creeping Buttercup is a low growing perennial weed which prefers wet heavy soils. Creeping Buttercups spread with vigorous creeping stems that run along the ground rooting at intervals with a very fibrous rooting system.   You need to make sure you remove all the fibrous roots as well as the main part of the weed, as this tricky...
  5. The Benefits of Crop Protectors

    The Benefits of Crop Protectors
    When we spend so much time helping our carrots, cauliflowers and cucumbers to grow it would be a real waste to let the pigeons get in there for the first bite!   Crop protectors allow you to defend your veg against invaders, but make sure you choose a net that matches your needs.
  6. Problem Weeds.. Ground Elder

    Problem Weeds.. Ground Elder
    Ground Elder can be a real pest, and a tricky one to get rid of when it takes hold of your vegetable patch. But if you follow these quick tips you should be able to banish it from your garden in no time.   The key thing is to make sure you pull out the whole root, not just...
  7. How to grow French Beans

    How to grow French Beans
      Plants don’t get much more productive than French beans. The beans hang so heavy on the plants you’d think the stems would collapse, giving you a plentiful harvest from minimal space in your raised vegetable beds. They are also very attractive, offering various flower and bean colours, so you could even incorporate them into your ornamental beds. Bees love the...
  8. How to turn your Raised Beds into Hot Beds

    How to turn your Raised Beds into Hot Beds
    Our friend Mark Abbott-Compton over at www.learn-how-to-garden.com has put together this great tutorial on how to build your very own Hot Bed using a WoodBlocX Raised Bed. It's a technique that the Victorians popularised throughout the UK many years ago, but is just as effective today! Used since Roman times with a cold frame on top, Hot Beds were once quite...
  9. Salads for all seasons from your raised beds

    Salads for all seasons from your raised beds
      Salad leaves are one of the crops that really do benefit from being home grown. No longer do you need to put up with supermarket salad bags that always seem to have a few soggy, smelly leaves in the bottom, you can pick fresh salad get it almost instantly onto the plate as and when you need it...
  10. Top Tips for Gardening with Children at School

    Top Tips for Gardening with Children at School
      If you’ve ever despaired at your children’s lack of interest in eating fruit and vegetables, why not try growing some with them? Following the whole process from sowing the seed to harvesting the crop, and then cooking it together, can really make children invest in their labours – they’ll want to taste what they’ve spent all that time...

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